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  1. According to Eric Newton of the Knight Foundation, my grandchildren will have computers attached to their brains. No, Newton doesn’t have a crystal ball—he has a formula of predicting the future of media based on patterns of communication in the past, a thorough investigation of media as it is today, and even by taking some inspiration from science fiction (he presented three modern technologies, Skype, cell phones and the iPad, and showed us how they were “predicted” by science fiction almost half a century ago in “The Jetsons,” “Star Trek” and 2001: A Space Odyssey, respectively). The underlying theme of the entire Must See Monday was the fact that the future is “crazy.” Although Newton is understandably proud of his formula, it really could just as kooky as Harold Camping’s rapture prediction earlier this year. Newton suggested that students prepare themselves by learning to perform in the future that has been/is being predicted, while also being flexible to a random turn-of-events.

  2. I really enjoyed tonight’s Must See Monday series. I’ve never really had the idea to create my own business, but I thought Dan Gillmore brought up an interesting point when he said that today’s students might have to create their own jobs later – hence the importance of learning entrepreneurship skills now. I was really impressed by the four different “start up” companies the Knight Center for Digital Media Entrepreneurship students created. Although I’m interested in checking all of them out, I was really fascinated by WatchTree. WatchTree was designed after its two creators had trouble locating volunteering opportunities in their communities (Scottsdale and Gilbert). WatchTree is designed so people can easily locate and get involved with local volunteering opportunities. One of the site’s creators explained how WatchTree will use social media outlets like Twitter to blast updates about new volunteering opportunities, updates and events to all of its followers.I have wanted to get involved with local community service efforts for a long time, but never seem to follow through because searching for opportunities is too much effort, so WatchTree would be a great resource for me! CityCircles, the next company presented, is an innovative company that aims to provide up-to-date news and events based on fixed interest points. They’re currently working on providing information about events and news near the Phoenix Metro Lightrail stops. As a lightrail commuter, I would definitely consider using this website to find events and restaurants along the lightrail stop. Another company, Fictionado, is still a work in progress, but aims to provide people with access to short stories and articles via their mobile devices. The speaker explained that ads for Fictionado content will include barcodes people can photograph with their mobile devices. These ads will be placed on the lightrail, in waiting rooms, etc. so people who have time to kill can conveniently access something short to read while they wait. (Pretty genius idea, I thought). Once people get the barcode on their device, the content they want will be formatted so it can be viewed on their cell phones, Kindles, iPads, etc. Blimee was the last company to be introduced. The speaker talked about “digital signage, a term (I must admit) I’ve never heard of before. Basically digital signage involves the LCD screens that have been popping up in shopping centers, on buses, etc. lately. They usually display advertisements, “spam” as the speaker put it. Blimee’s objective is to incorporate local news onto these screens. News so local that each screen will only display what’s happening within a few blocks of its location! The speaker also discussed how Blimee hopes to partner with local businesses, allowing them to advertise store sales and other opportunities to customers in the area. I’m really glad I got the opportunity to learn about these new companies. Hopefully they’ll take off!

  3. ?Eric Newton, Senior Advisor to the President of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, led the Must See Mondays lecture, “A History of the Future of News: What 1767 Tells Us About 2110,” and made some dubious points about the gradual change in media and journalism. He began the chronological tour of the ever-changing media world with verbal communication, then upgraded to the pamphlet; penny press; the telegraph until we  arrived to where we are today—helplessly occupied by our cell phones, iPads, televisions and computers. He touched on how early popular TV programs helped the creation of many of the devices we have the opportunity of using. The Flintstones had its version of Skype, where its characters were able to communicate via video, and Star Trek unveiled the planet’s first cell phone. These out-of-the-box inventions backed the words of Newton, when he said we must think “crazy and out of this world,” when moving forward in this digital age.

  4. Eric Newton, the senior adviser to the president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, spoke in the Walter Cronkite School’s first amendment forum Monday night on the future and history of news. Newton emphasized in the lecture, what 1676 tells us about 2110, that the technology we are using today seemed crazy at one point but many of the inventions we now use such as Skype, cell phones, and the iPad were seen in movies years ago. He said that every American generation grows up with a different form of media starting in 1767. In 1767 it began with pamphlets and from there media progressed to newspapers, then to daily newspapers because of the printing press, then the telegraph and so on. He also said that history shows every 80 years there is a tragedy or great awakening, for example the civil war was 80 years before WWII and we will be another time of tragedy and experience World War 3.0. He also said that there are already “cyber armies.” According to Newton, media is becoming more personal, portable, and participatory. He also said that the journalism and mass communication field is changing drastically and that print journalism will die. He predicted that in the future there will be intelligent media, bio media (which will include augmented reality), machine awareness, hyper media where data will be imported to our brains, and also Omni media where information will be exported from our brains in the form of things such as telepathy. At the conclusion of these changes he predicted there will be a World War 4.0, he said this is a war in which humans will be fighting against non-humans. At the end of this lecture he said that there are multiple reasons why this wouldn’t happen but reminded the audience that no matter how crazy it seems it is still an option.

  5. Cronkite Night At the Movies“The Pelican Brief” At the beginning of this thrilling movie I, personally, had no idea what the connection was between this movie and journalism. As the movie progressed, though, the connection became clear. Denzel Washington’s character provided an exceptional view of what an investigative reporter does and how they provide a pivotal role to the journalism society. Although this story was based off a book, it is quite possible that something of this nature could happen in real life. This movie provides a visual of how exciting and beneficial investigative journalism can be. The loss of such in depth and accurate reporting has been slightly lost in today’s journalism market, which is quite unsettling. Although investigative reporting is expensive, the field will eventually pay itself off by providing the audience with what is needed and wanted. “The Pelican Brief” was a thrilling to watch, but most of all it placed investigative journalism in a sincere light.

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